Laynie Browne and Julie Carr

Julie Carr and Laynie Browne
Julie Carr and Laynie Browne

Laynie Browne and Julie Carr discuss their new Essay Press chapbooks, Browne’s Deciduous Letters to Invisible Beloveds and Carr’s The Silence that Fills the Future.

Laynie Browne: You write: “To see into something that can’t be seen, to name something that has no name, to speak to someone who cannot respond (to, in Lyotard’s terms, “bear witness” to “unpresentability”)—this seems to me to be the other work of confession, the work that can never be finished, that keeps confession alive.”

This notion is so compelling. The unseen. In linking this seeing to confession the question that I keep arriving at is: to who is one confessing? How then not to begin to see everything as confession? Even withholding, turning away from the confessional feels like a form of confession. Once begun it permeates everything. Is confession a mode of address, a method of thinking and being in relation, or one way to look at all conversation? On the surface, even dialogue which appears to resist confession becomes another form of confession. The weight of the unsaid, pregnant.